ON THE FRONT DOOR

April 7, 2017

ON THE FRONT DOOR
Today is Nissan 10 in the Hebrew calendar, the day that all children of Israel were to take a lamb into their homes. That little lamb was to live with the family for a few days.
Exodus 12: 3 says “Speak to all the congregation of Israel, saying, 'On the tenth of this month they are each one to take a lamb for themselves, according to their fathers' households, a lamb for each household.” This lamb was to be a male, unblemished, one year old. Perhaps it was a family pet of one of the children, kept outside with the other animals. Every Israelite was to do this. Every Israelite was to take a lamb into the home. This lamb became part of this family for these days.
This was a universal judgment. The entire congregation of Israel was to do this. This was a universal edict from God. This was an awesome edict from God. The children of Israel had been prisoners in the land of Egypt, under bondage to many Pharaohs. Moses, God’s spokesman and Israel had witnessed nine plagues God had brought upon this country; here was the tenth. Unlike the other nine plagues where Israel had been protected, this was a universal edict. All Israel needed to heed God.
This was a peculiar edict. A lamb was to be selected. Meticulous orders had to be followed. Did you live in a poor home? Then you and your neighbor were to share in the sacrifice of the lamb. It was to be brought into your home until Nissan 14.
“You shall keep it until the fourteenth day of the same month, and then the whole assembly of the congregation of Israel is to kill it at twilight.” (Exodus 12:6) God even gave the time of day when this lamb was to be killed. Not in the daylight, not at the darkness, but at twilight.
Specific instructions followed regarding the cooking preparation, the eating of the lamb, who was to partake and why.
“They shall eat the flesh that same night, roasted with fire, and they shall eat it with unleavened bread and bitter herbs. Do not eat any of it raw or boiled at all with water, but rather roasted with fire, both its head and its legs along with its entrails. And you shall not leave any of it over until morning, but whatever is left of it until morning, you shall burn with fire. “(Ex. 12:8-10)
Instructions were given on how one was to be dressed. “Now you shall eat it in this manner: with your loins girded, your sandals on your feet, and your staff in your hand; and you shall eat it in haste--it is the LORD'S Passover. “ (Ex. 12:11) Note that this is not the Jew’s Passover; this is the LORD’S Passover.
For I will go through the land of Egypt on that night, and will strike down all the firstborn in the land of Egypt, both man and beast; and against all the gods of Egypt I will execute judgments--I am the LORD. (Ex. 12:12)
But the instructions included the following “Moreover, they shall take some of the blood and put it on the two doorposts and on the lintel of the houses in which they eat it. The blood shall be a sign for you on the houses where you live; and when I see the blood I will pass over you, and no plague will befall you to destroy you when I strike the land of Egypt.” (Ex. 12:7, 13)
God required blood. The blood of the lamb. In preparing the lamb, the blood was to be drained from the lamb’s body. In Kosher food preparation, all blood is to be drained from meat. Leviticus 17:11 says “For the life of the flesh is in the blood” so all life must be drained from a dead animal before consumption. Blood is only used for religious purposes. But the blood of the lamb is used here in a much different way.
The blood was to be applied to the lintels and the two doorposts. The lintel is the horizontal crosspiece over the door. The doorposts are the vertical supports. Most homes in ancient times had only one main door. If there was another door, it was used for animals to go in and out, as in cold winters; animals would occupy the homes because of the warmth.
The blood of the lamb was to be applied on the crosspiece and the two sides. Some scholars note that this is the first sign of the cross. But what is interesting is that the blood is to be applied on the front door, not on a window, not on a back animal entrance (which one would think it would have been good as it was the larger entrance). No, the blood had to be placed on the front door, to proclaim that this home is redeemed by the blood of the lamb.
“The blood shall be a sign for you on the houses where you live; and when I see the blood I will pass over you, and no plague will befall you to destroy you when I strike the land of Egypt.” (Ex. 12:13)
There are times when I place the blood on the back door. There are times in my own life when I want to keep my witness for Yeshua on the back burner, on the back of my shirt, on my back door, not on the front door. Do I watch something on TV that I should not? Do I read questionable content? Do I speak wrong against my neighbor? LORD, forgive me for not giving the respect due to the Lamb of God. May we never be ashamed of the Blood of the Lamb, for “Worthy is the Lamb that was slain to receive power and riches and wisdom and might and honor and glory and blessing." Rev. 5:12






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BBarri Cae Seif (formerly Mallin)  is an instructor, author, and theologian. Her experience has led her through opportunities in corporate sales, Sunday school education, travel, Bible college instruction, authoring, conference speaking and twice annual trips to Israel as President of a humanitarian organization. 

In addition, Barri maintains her status as online faculty at several universities, teaching the Graduate level Business classes and undergraduate Bible and Business classes. She also serves as a content chair for several doctoral students. She also is President of Maasay Yahdav, a charity that brings humanitarian aid to Israel twice yearly.

Barri holds a Ph.D. in Biblical Studies from Trinity Theological Seminary. Her focus was the Exegetical study of Romans 10:4. She earned an MBA from Amberton University with concentration in General Management. She earned a BA in Psychology at Stephens College.

Her published works include three devotionals, 
Intimate Moments with the Hebrew Names of God, Bridge-Logos Publishers, 1999.
The Name – HaShem Daily Devotional Worship, CreateSpace Publishers, 2010.
There’s Just Something about That Name, Bridge-Logos Publishers, 2011.

Her response to the love of Jesus is what guides her. She currently resides in Ovilla, Texas, with her husband, Dr. Jeffrey L Seif.

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